The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper intervention, people with prediabetes are very likely to become type 2 diabetics within a decade.
The team emphasizes that there is a large gap between curing diabetic mice and achieving the same in human beings. They say that they'd like to start clinical trials in three years, but more animal testing is needed first at a cost of about US$5 million, as well as making an application to the US Food and Drug Administration for investigational new drug approval.
The drug reduces the amount of glucose made by the liver, and is frequently prescribed because it has been found to help prevent many of the long-term complications of diabetes. Metformin is usually taken without another drug, usually at a dose of 500 milligrams (mg) a day, depending on the brand, to start. Doses are not to exceed 2,000 or 2,500 mg per day.

Type 1 diabetes is a particularly unpleasant condition. It occurs when the pancreas ceases to produce the insulin needed by the body to metabolize sugar and, until the invention of artificial insulin injections, it was as deadly as cancer. Type 2 is the less severe form of the disease, where the body produces insufficient insulin; it can often be managed through diet alone.


In a study that looked at the anti-hyperglycemic and lipid-lowering properties of Emblica officinalis Gaertn. (Amla) fruit in normal and diabetic human volunteers, the results showed a significant decrease in fasting and 2-h post-prandial blood glucose levels on the 21st day in both normal and diabetic subjects receiving 1, 2 or 3 grams of Amla powder per day as compared with their baseline values.
So if you really want to prevent diabetes, boost your vitamin D levels with either daily sunshine or quality vitamin D3 supplements. Vitamin D deficiency explains why diabetes is so rampant among African Americans, by the way. Did you notice that doctors don't explain any of this to African American patients? It's the dirty little racist secret of both the diabetes and cancer industries...
If you google “diabetes cure” you are directed to websites like WebMD and the Mayo Clinic where you find information on diet, exercise, medication, and insulin therapy, but nothing about the cure. This lack of information may have to do with the fact that Americans spend $322 billion a year to treat diabetes, $60 billion a year on weight-loss programs, and $124 billion a year on snack foods. This is about 3% of the US economy! Because so many peoples’ livelihoods are supported by diabetes and its main cause, obesity, the viral effect of people getting cured and telling others is greatly diminished.
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