Researchers are discovering more about the causes of type 2 diabetes but as yet there are no clear avenues for a cure. With this said, there has been success in reversing the development of type 2 diabetes. Methods which result in a significant loss of weight have been successful in helping people to control blood glucose levels and have allowed some people to come off their diabetic medication. Methods such as bariatric surgery and very low calorie diets have been successful in allowing patients to reduce dependency on medication.
A new class of medications called DPP-4 inhibitors help improve A1C without causing hypoglycemia. They work by by preventing the breakdown of a naturally occurring compound in the body, GLP-1. GLP-1 reduces blood glucose levels in the body, but is broken down very quickly so it does not work well when injected as a drug itself. By interfering in the process that breaks down GLP-1, DPP-4 inhibitors allow it to remain active in the body longer, lowering blood glucose levels only when they are elevated. DPP-4 inhibitors do not tend to cause weight gain and tend to have a neutral or positive effect on cholesterol levels. Alogliptin (Nesina), linagliptin (Tradjenta), saxagliptin (Onglyza), and sitagliptin (Januvia) are the DPP-4 inhibitors currently on the market in the US.
Even as things stand now, there are a lot of people left out in the cold. A 2016 study, for instance, found that only 41,000 people with diabetes annually get bariatric surgery in the US—fewer than 5 percent of the total new cases diagnosed every year. And the longer someone has diabetes, studies have suggested, the less likely they are to go into remission if they eventually get surgery. Getting those numbers up will not only require changing the minds of insurers, but public opinion, too.
But people are curing diabetes every day. It's simple and straightforward, and when you cure diabetes, you greatly reduce your risk of heart disease, obesity and cancer at the same time. The thing is, no one will cure your diabetes for you. Sure, the drug companies want to "treat" you with diabetes drugs, but you have to keep taking those for a lifetime. They don't cure anything. The only real cure can come from YOU -- by changing what you eat and increasing your exercise.
You should have no more than three of these “feeding times” per day. The reason limiting the number and duration of your meal times is so important has to do with staying out of the vicious cycle of increasing insulin resistance. To get smart on insulin resistance — the cause of both type 2 diabetes and obesity — read Dr. Jason Fung’s book, The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss, or watch his free lecture on YouTube.
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