Beware of claims that seem too good to be true. Look for scientific-based sources of information. The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse collects resource information for the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Reference Collection, a service of the National Institutes of Health. To learn more about alternative therapies for diabetes treatment, contact the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Clearinghouse.

Although the promises are big, these technologies are still far from the market. First, clinical trials will have to show they do work. Then, the price could be steep, as cell therapy precedents for other applications, such as oncology, come with price tags that reach the six figures and are finding difficulties to get reimbursed. Considering that compared to cancer, diabetes is not an immediately life-threatening disease, health insurers in some countries might be reluctant to cover the treatment.

Parslane seeds have strong medicinal value and have been used to keep a check on blood sugar since ages. The compounds of parslane seeds help the body to produce insulin in a natural manner. Just consume a teaspoonful of parslane seeds with half a coup of water on a regular basis (everyday) for 4-5 months. It is one of the simpler, but effective home remedies for diabetes.
In his laboratory research, Adams has made numerous food safety breakthroughs such as revealing rice protein products imported from Asia to be contaminated with toxic heavy metals like lead, cadmium and tungsten. Adams was the first food science researcher to document high levels of tungsten in superfoods. He also discovered over 11 ppm lead in imported mangosteen powder, and led an industry-wide voluntary agreement to limit heavy metals in rice protein products.
Sulfonylureas stimulate the beta cells of the pancreas to release more insulin. Sulfonylurea drugs have been in use since the 1950s. Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) is the only first-generation sulfonylurea still in use today. The second generation sulfonylureas are used in smaller doses than the first-generation drugs. There are three second-generation drugs: glimepiride (Amaryl), glipizide (Glucotrol and Glucotrol XL), and glyburide (Micronase, Glynase, and Diabeta). These drugs are generally taken one to two times a day, before meals. All sulfonylurea drugs have similar effects on blood glucose levels, but they differ in side effects, how often they are taken, and interactions with other drugs.
It’s a clinical trial that is being held at mass general. I am surprised by the rather negative comments on here. I am happily going to the Faustma Lab in a few weeks to meet with Denise and see what the study is about. You should contact Mass General and find out more. I am a Boston area native but flying 1500miles to learn about the study. Typically insurance companies don’t conduct or have much to do with clinical trials. They can’t make money off us if we are cured or using less insulin! Oh insurance companies are such pains… Read more »
Over the last century, advancements in new treatments aided by the remarkable developments in computer technology have helped many people better manage the disease, but achieving optimal glucose control remains an unattainable goal for the vast majority of those with diabetes, and particularly among young people. Despite patients' best attempts, managing diabetes remains a challenging, daily balancing act that requires constant vigilance. That's because insulin therapy cannot ideally mimic the exquisite biological function of a healthy pancreas. And that's why the Diabetes Research Institute and Foundation remain passionately committed to achieving this singular goal. Learn more about our progress toward a cure and the steps we are taking to turn our vision into reality.
A success story? Perhaps. But experts advise caution. For one thing, because Sweet Eze contains six different ingredients -- and because the severity of diabetes symptoms can fluctuate on their own -- it's hard to say what exactly is responsible for Cottingham's improvement. For another, supplements carry their own risks. Some products don't contain the ingredients listed on their labels. Others come mixed with dangerous -- and unlisted -- ingredients. And scientists are just beginning to verify which ones actually work.
The title is misleading to say the least. The first 71 pages are mostly about how the author has done such a wonderful job of coming up with the theories to write this book. What really got me was when she says in the beginning about trying combinations of diet, exercise, and/or medication but she has a better plan...which is her diet and exercises with other replacement herbs and such for medication. This is not a cure by even my imagination. It does have some good information and the format is decent. Although pretty much all the information is either online or common sense, it is all in one place which is pretty much the only reason I'm not returning it. It is very doubtful I will actually make any of the recipes but they are interesting to flip through. The easy to read format and writing is why I'm fining this 2 stars instead of 1 star. If you're looking for basic information and some common sense suggestions (example: cut down on sweets and sugar in your diet) then this is a worthwhile purchase. Otherwise this book has no magic bullet information that will cure diabetes.

Maintaining normal blood sugar levels is necessary for the body’s overall health. Erratic blood sugar levels can affect the body’s ability to function normally and even lead to complications if left unchecked. Some herbs and spices found in nature do a tremendous job of naturally lowering blood sugar levels, making them a boon for diabetics and pre-diabetics. What’s more, being nature’s multi-taskers, herbs and spices also produce overall health benefits beyond just helping balance blood sugar.
If you google “diabetes cure” you are directed to websites like WebMD and the Mayo Clinic where you find information on diet, exercise, medication, and insulin therapy, but nothing about the cure. This lack of information may have to do with the fact that Americans spend $322 billion a year to treat diabetes, $60 billion a year on weight-loss programs, and $124 billion a year on snack foods. This is about 3% of the US economy! Because so many peoples’ livelihoods are supported by diabetes and its main cause, obesity, the viral effect of people getting cured and telling others is greatly diminished.
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